Interior Design Projects

FCANCER Headquarters, Studio Semester IV

March, 2021

Located at 465 Grand Street in New York City, the FCancer Headquarters was my first multistory building and accounted for 18,000 sq/ft of designable space. In this project, I created an exhibition space, exterior façade, and double heighted area.

Duck Camp Product Development Studio

August, 2020

Over the summer I had the opportunity to re-decorate the product development studio at the Duck Camp headquarters. Duck Camp is a luxury hunting and fishing apparel line, which their office and showroom highlights, in addition to showing off some Austin charm.

CRISPR Headquarters, Studio Semester III

December, 2020

I, in collaboration with my two groupmates, designed a 13,000 sq/ft headquarters for CRISPR gene editing in plants. The goal of the project was to select a groundbreaking technology and create an office space for the company, in addition to, designing serendipity spaces for a democratic work flow. The requirements for the project included a COVID adapted plan, fully rendered perspectives, and a video showing off the entire space.

Marwoolus Flagship & Showroom, Studio Semester III

October, 2020

This project was entirely inspired by an innovative design material where I then created an office space that was highlighted with a showroom.

Covid-19 Memorial, Studio Semester III & Design Class Competition

November, 2020

The mission of the Covid-19 Sculpture Memorial Park is to commemorate the lives of those, who based on statistics, should not have died. This includes those under 45 years old with no preexisting conditions who were traumatically lost in the 2020 worldwide pandemic. Over the quarantine of 2020 I found myself in a deep social media hole stumbling on celebrity trainer, Amanda Kloots. Kloots and her husband, Nick Cordero, a 41 yr-old Broadway star, were settling down in Los Angeles with their infant, Elvis, back in March when Cordero got diagnosed with Covid-19. During his 95 day battle, Cordero was put on a ventilator, spent six weeks in a medically induced coma, and lost his right leg due to severe blood clotting. On July 5th, Cordero not only left behind his wife and son, but he left behind the very real story that this disease can fatally affect young people, with no pre-existing health conditions. Cordero’s tragic departure inspired me to focus on his story, in addition to nine others who passed suddenly due to Covid. 

As someone who was living in the south during the time, it was like living in a parallel universe where nothing ever happened. As I saw my friends go back to their schools in the SEC, posting pictures and videos at concerts, crowded bars and restaurants it makes me think about the small percentage, that grew, of young, healthy people who are losing their lives. That is why the Covid-19 Sculpture Memorial Park was designed to be immersed into the University of Alabama’s front quad. These schools in addition to the state of Alabama itself, where masks weren’t required, were notorious for not taking the pandemic seriously. The park was designed to be subtly integrated into the quad and will be functional as it offers seating arrangements. My goal was to not only inform those on campus of what has been happening, and show them that the disease doesn’t just affect the older population, but to evoke empathy for the lives tragically lost and offer a gathering place for others to remember. 

Each sculpture is unique to the individual and represents that they will not be forgotten. The double bench sculpture, in image 2, represents the “emergency” symbol, as Israel Tolentino Jr. was a firefighter and volunteer EMT. The conceptualized music note in image 3, symbolizes Oliver Stokes, who was a high school coordinator but loved to DJ on the weekends. Dez-Ann Romain was a highschool principal who was the first New York City public school official to die from Covid-19. Her sculpture, in image 4, represents the first among the many, in the New York City public school system to pass, and that we will remember her along with the others. 

Each figure contributed so much to their community and left behind the many that they helped. At the Covid-19 Sculpture Memorial Park, we can commemorate these special lives and be reminded that this disease can affect us all.